Select an Account to Sign In

Thryv

Text & Email, Appointment Scheduling, Customer Database

MyDex Account

Pay Bills, View Reporting, Manage Your Listings

Local Marketing

Strategy of Answering Questions – What If You Can’t Do What You Said You Can Do

Strategy of Answering Questions – What If You Can’t Do What You Said You Can Do

By | 03.01.13
Strategy of Answering Questions – What If You Can’t Do What You Said You Can Do

Answering the tough questionsWas it Because of Poor Planning or Lousy Execution?

– Fifth in a 6-post series –

In my previous blog post, I talked about the how to best prepare messaging for business meetings (or interviews) by building a bridge from the question to your message.

But how do you answer the really tough questions? To get started, let’s first review the messages surrounding the launch of our sample product or service:

  • Last several years developing, testing and refining new technology
  • Enables consumers to accomplish tasks faster and more efficiently
  • Target audience is men and women 35-54 years old; educated; high disposable income
  • Vastly improves existing technology

And the possible types of questions:

  • Late to market
  • Too expensive
  • Not going to succeed
  • Already outdated
  • Not needed

My contention is that the toughest trap question is nothing more than a great chance to get your messages across (once you concisely answer the question). Let’s take a look at some of the most common trap questions:

A or B Questions:  “Was it poor planning or poor execution that made you guys late to market?” The A or B question is asked in a way that suggests an answer.  However, the options offered may not be the correct response.  You can pick an alternate direct response: Answer:  “Neither. The new technology vastly improves the outdated technology…”

Hypothetical Questions:  “If this new technology flops, will the company survive?”  The iffy question asks you to predict the future.  This type of question usually asks you to accept the hypothesis. Instead, you can reject the theory and create one of your own.  Thus, the answer is: “That’s not going to happen.  We’ve spent the last several years developing…”

Third Party Questions:  You never have to argue with or defend anyone else.  Third parties include but are not limited to: competitors, industry analysts, other people in the company, customers or other industries. The best answer to questions about other people is: “Ask them,” or “I can’t speak for them.” Then you can bridge to the issue in the question.

Unfair/untrue statements:  These questions contain misleading or untrue assertions or the question may include inflammatory words or phrases.  “Why are you charging so much for a technology that is outdated?” Here there are several incorrect statements. You never want to repeat back the negatives (especially in an interview), but you can absolutely disagree with the premise. “That’s not true. This technology vastly improves existing technology and we are targeting men and women with a high disposable income…”

While there are certainly other types of “trap questions” that may or may not be designed to trip you up, proper preparation  should prevent any of them from becoming an issue. Also, remember there are questions you don’t have to answer – competitive, security, etc. My next and final post in this series will tie everything together by providing message preparation steps and tips.

(Visited 54 times, 1 visits today)
Share on: Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to LinkedIn
Comments

Like what you see?
Get more free content.

Next Up In Local Marketing

[Podcast] How Knoxville Room Service Is Opening Doors in their Local Market

[Podcast] How Knoxville Room Service Is Opening Doors in their Local Market

Read More

Front Lines to Front Lawns: 6 Veteran Landscapers’ Top Marketing Tips

Front Lines to Front Lawns: 6 Veteran Landscapers’ Top Marketing Tips

Read More

[Podcast] How this Plumbing Business Uses Digital Marketing to Stay Swamped

[Podcast] How this Plumbing Business Uses Digital Marketing to Stay Swamped

Read More

Explore the Blog